Back Pain


Back pain is one of the most common work-related injuries and is often caused by ordinary work activities such as sitting in an office chair or heavy lifting. Applying ergonomic principles - the study of the workplace as it relates to the worker - can help prevent work-related back pain and back injury and help maintain a healthy back.

The goal of an ergonomics program in industry is to adapt the workplace to a specific worker, dependent on the job description, required tasks, and physical make up of the employee performing those tasks. Two types of situations typically cause people to begin having back pain or to sustain a back injury while on the job:

1.Non-accidental injury, where pain arises as a result of normal activities and requirements of the task. Poor body mechanics (such as slouching in an office chair), prolonged activity, repetitive motions, and fatigue are major contributors to these injuries. This may occur from sitting in an office chair or standing for too long in one position.

2.Accidental injury results when an unexpected event triggers injury during the task. A load that slips or shifts as it is being lifted, and a slip and fall or hitting one's head on a cabinet door are typical examples. These accidents can jolt the neck, back, and other joints with resulting muscle strain or tearing of soft tissue in the back.

Check out our online course on “Display Screen Equipment Training” which helps address these matters.

Display Screen Equipment Training

These courses are aimed at users of display screen equipment (DSE) and those responsible for assessing display screen equipment. A ‘user’, is anyone who regularly uses display screen equipment for a significant part of their normal work. In practice, if you use display screen equipment continuously for more than one hour a day, then you’re a ‘user’.

So what do we mean by display screen equipment?

The first thing most people think of is a computer monitor. But that’s not the only thing it refers to Display screen equipment could also mean laptops, tablet PCs, televisions, smartphones, CNC control pads, portable diagnostic screens or equipment containing cathode ray tubes, or CRTs.

The Health and Safety (Display Screen Equipment) Regulations contain special directives covering

DSE safety. Both employers and employee‐users have responsibilities under the legislation.

This course fulfils your statutory training obligations and covers among other things,,, the correct way to set up and use your display screen equipment safely. Reducing the risk of work related conditions.

Display Screen Equipment Awareness:

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http://www.videotilehost.co.uk/hs/acres/purchaseCourse.php?nid=24

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